Agile Policy Making

Complexity Theory and Public Policyagile-policy-making

Dr. Graham Room, in his book Complexity, Institutions and Public Policy, argues that current policy analysis techniques cannot fully capture the dynamic processes between the actors in any given policy area especially when using only longitudinal data. He uses complexity theory to establish his agile policy-making toolkit, which is an eight-step, cyclical process:

  1. Map the landscape – understand the policy arena’s issues and current challenges.
  2. Identify the protagonists –know the players and stakeholders in the policy arena and their relationships to each other.
  3. Model the struggle – create multiple scenarios to understand how the policy landscape may evolve.
  4. Watch for tipping points – identify the triggers that could dramatically shift the structure into a new form.
  5. Tune the landscape – use analytical tools and discussions to move the policy arena into directions that are more productive.
  6. Energize the protagonists – help some of the protagonists build capacity and take other actions to encourage cooperative behavior toward win-win situations.
  7. Civilize the struggle – help create win-win situations and limit destructive behaviors by the protagonists.
  8. Watch for predators –keep one or more protagonists from unfairly tipping the balance of power and creating a destructive struggle in the landscape.

A vital concept, agile policy making is treating agencies as complex adaptive systems or as entities that anticipate and respond to their environments. That is why modeling the dynamics of internal agency processes and relationships between agencies is necessary to fully understand future policies.

 

reprinted from http://patimes.org/agile-policy-making-complexity-theory-big-data-data-science-research-changing-practice-policy-making/

Solutions

It’s easy to point out problems, almost anyone can see what is broken in our world. I’m tired of seeing messages for people
to “wake up” and “see the system.” How about offering Comprehensive, Scalable, Sustainable Solutions… ?

Relational Practices

Intersubjectivity

Inter-subjective Nexus, relational field, we space, awakened inter-subjective field, waking down.. I’m currently seeking a practice group for inter-subjective meditation. ‘Mutual Awakening’ goes by many different names – most of them from Integral theory. Here are a few:

Inter-subjective Nexus

Awakened Inter-subjective Field

Circling

Authentic Relating Games

Waking Down

Thomas Huebl – Transparent Communication and the Awakened WE

Relational Practices

These all have a different feel but sort of point to the same phenomena, the potency of inter-subjective awakening and co-creation. A feedback loop of awakening. Any of these would be a wonderful place to start.

Future Ready Co-Living Communities Initiative

 San Diego Future-Ready CoLiving Communities Initiative

November 28, 2013 at 9:36am

 “Despite current ads and slogans, the world doesn’t change one person at a time. It changes as networks of relationships form among people who discover they share a common cause and vision of what’s possible.”
— Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze

My status update from November 27th seemed to spark something for people. This note is meant to expand and circulate the energy around creating a Future-Ready Co-Living Community in San Diego which started with a desire for:

” a co-housing setup with social entrepreneurs, futurists, hacktivists, progressive scientists, culture makers, and influencers who collectively and individually work on projects and partake in integral/collective insight practices…”

There is a lot of excitement around developing not just one but many  flavors of intentional community in San Diego and all over the world – it seems the time has come to move forward.

The landscape is prime for people to participate in the creation of these communities on a larger-scale than ever before.

  1. We have access to collaborative digital financing tools that we have never had access to before
  2. Social Media and sharing platforms allow us to communicate and share resources and tools as never before

Truly there are a multitude of “flavors” of co-living arrangements. A comprehensive list can be found from Venessa Miemes – http://emergentbydesign.com/2012/01/08/93-superhero-schools-collaboratories-incubators-accelerators-hubs-for-social-tech-innovation/#sthash.0Dybxfgf.dpuf and we are familiar in this thread with the Tech-Driven communities in San Francisco: http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Tech-entrepreneurs-revive-communal-living-4988388.php

So what is the secret sauce of the ideal community? And where is San Diego in all of this?

San Diego has a wide variety of communities that emphasize and actively embrace co-living. Here are some ideas of the varieties:

  • IDEA District and Maker Quarter  (in formation) – Including all the MakerFaire Peeps
  • San Diego’s Eco-Villages:

Several people and organizations have been experimenting and working toward communal living for many years and I’d like to acknowledge those efforts in our region, these include: Activated Villages and Emerald Village , Treekaya – part of the Transition Towns movement, LeCase EcoVillage, San Diego Eco-Village, Blue Sky Ranch and a new initiative called Boulder Gardens

  • San Diego’s Spiritual Community, affectionately called ‘The Community’ – this is a 1,000+ person community.

There are various home names: Bouncing Buddha, Moonlight Oasis by the Sea, The Den, Sanctuary, Fire Garden, Aum Dome, SkyPad, Ignite, Fusion Room, Whisper House and more…

In my time spent in the community  I’ve noticed an exquisite emphasis on relational practices and systems of influence (perhaps due in part to the confluent rise with Internet Marketers in our region). There’s no shortage of co-creation and collaborative endeavors between people!

In thinking deeply about the strengths of the community  and what it is that limits the potential of what such a powerfully connected community can be and achieve together a key differentiator of the co-living ideologies of the past and the ‘social labs’ being created can be summed up in this quote from Embassy Co-Founder Jessy Kate Schingler:

“We’re not trying to build isolationist, internally focused communes out in the middle of nowhere; we’re rebuilding cities”

I think this quality can come from one Key shift – the shift to seeing oneself as a Global Citizen.

What are the qualities of Future-Ready Co-Living Communities?

No matter what your personal “flavor” of communal living – be it eco-village, urban, spiritual, tech etc. there are a few keys that Future-Ready Co-Living Communities have in common:

  • A commitment to the betterment of humanity and a recognition of each member as a global citizen
  • Built-in self-supporting industries that makes the old system obsolete over time
  • Radical Opennness
  • A system of influence
  • The ability to improve living standards for everyone (Jacob Lucas-Schwartz)
  • A community of practice – Meg Wheatley article http://margaretwheatley.com/articles/using-emergence.pdf  (c/o Sheri Herndon)
  • A plan to move toward off-grid power and self-reliance
  • Shared communication networks

I’d like to pose a question to members of the community:

How do we create more engagement with the wider community and leverage our strengths in service of these Future-Ready Community ideals? How do we move toward a Future-Ready Community as a collective? What types of relational practices can we foster to bring out these qualities? Are these even the right questions?

Now for the all important question.

Why?

I alluded to a tool I’m developing… it’s a predictive analytics model to forecast the future career landscape based on emerging technologies to help people move through the economic transition. This project came out of one question. “HOW will this economic transition take place?”

Let this idea sink in: “We are creating technologies that could potentially displace the very consumer market that would purchase those technologies”

The next steps for this plan are being developed. Investors and Real Estate Developers are ready to support us in making this a reality. Money is not an object in this endeavor.

*Anyone who shares this note will be added to a group for early-adopters of Future-Ready CoLiving Communities*

The purpose of this group will be to:

  • Share resources about developing intentional communities
  • Strategize
  • Liaison with other intentional community groups

It’s clear we are ready for this.

When you share this note mention the name of the co-living space where you currently live (if you live in one) and let us know ONE thing… what’s your flavor?

If I have missed anyone that should be tagged, please tag them. If you want to email me personally you can reach me at mirona@ucla.edu

Resources:

View the Original Post Here: 

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social value

Unspoken Social Rule of the Day: I realized that I am very generous with praise ,compliments, and recognition – this often leads people to undervalue my gestures in this regard. It’s an unfortunate realization that it’s likely the people that give whole-heartedly frequently go unnoticed and unrecognized themselves. It’s also unfortunate that people who give just enough to be recognized and in demand  – but not more than that, are appreciated for that quality. Instead of blaming people that don’t understand or see the value of what I offer, I need to accept the reality of this diminishing law of returns. It’s like trying to give someone food when they are full – they won’t want it, they don’t crave, desire or appreciate it. This is a subtle rule that socially cunning people often understand but nobody talks about. It makes me realize, out of necessity, I need to give less to more places. If I want my generosity of words, thoughts, and deeds to be valued I need to give less to more places/people. Perhaps volunteering in different places.

How I found adventure

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How I Found Adventure

By Beatrice Grimshaw (1871 – 1953)

I am a Victorian.

I was born in the ‘Seventies, in a big lonely country house five miles–a whole hour’s journey–from Belfast.

I was governessed and schooled and colleged. I was taught to ride and play games. I was taught to behave. To write notes for Mamma. To do the flowers. To be polite but not too polite, to Young Gentlemen. To accept flowers, sweets and books from them, but no more. To rise swiftly with the rest of the six daughters and sons when Papa came into the breakfast-room, to kiss him ceremoniously, and rush to wait upon him. He liked it, and we liked it.

I went to dances, and waltzed to “The Blue Danube,” “Sweethearts,” and “Estudiantina.” I went to afternoon parties. I was chaperoned. My three sisters were good girls, and content.

But I was the Revolting Daughter–as they called them then. I bought a bicycle, with difficulty. I rode it unchaperoned, mile and miles beyond the limits possible to the soberly trotting horses. The world opened before me. And as soon as my twenty-first birthday dawned, I went away from home, to see what the world might to give to daughters who revolted. What it gave me first was the offer of a journalistic post.

There were maps of far-away places, maps with tantalizing blanks in them; maps of the huge Pacific, colored an entrancing blue. I swore that I would go there.

I made a London newspaper commission me; I went. Long ago, when travel was travel, and the South Sea unknown to tourists; when the charm of the island world was still unbroken. I went to all the chief island groups, and lived in most; I saw the inner New Hebrides, Solomons and New Guinea, at their rawest and fiercest; I roamed all over the East beyond the East, before anyone had begun to think of Java, or the Bali kings had prophetically committed suicide on their coral reefs.

I had so many adventures that they cease to seem adventures. In the New Hebrides, I was caught in a forest fire, and barely escaped into a valley where bones of a recent cannibal feast lay blackening in the smoke. I stood on the shores of Tanna, and watched a recruiting schooner creep cautiously in, afraid to land her boats, while the men of the mountains, fighters and cannibals all, waited with loaded guns beside me, ready to attack the blackbirding crew who had taken away their best. I was present at a dance of murderers and man-eaters, up in the Tanna hills, where no man went. There and elsewhere, I managed to make friends with the wild men of the woods.

In the Solomons, of recent years, I cam in contact with the amazing native magic of the sorcerer, and lived in a house that was haunted by ghostly birds.

I saw–still in the Solomons–men who declared they had solved the secret of a happy life; they said they knew how to project themselves into another man’s personality, provided he were agreed, and that such mutual changes often took place–wives, houses, names, habits, even faces, being transferred from one to another. They said they did this through their magic. Certainly the practice was fairly common, however it was brought about, and it seemed to please everybody.

I was given, by a chief, a charm as a safe-pass for a day and night among the wildest tribes. It was carved from a beautiful orange shell, and represented the circle of the sun caught in the curve of the crescent moon, I don’t know how much or little it had to do with the fact that I never got into any trouble, although I was told by the men of one tribe (Malaita, of course) that they might killed me or any white any day, just for fun, if they happened to feel like it.

I went to New Caledonia, famous, infamous French penal island, slept in one of a row of former convict cells, and saw the church where the celebrated mass marriages took place, a couple of hundred male convicts being married all at once to as many female convicts specially imported.

I was received by the natives of Dutch New Guinea with a curious ceremony, staged as well as Hollywood could have done it–knives and spears threateningly held up by some of the younger men, while older men raised high above them a burning brand and a branch of palms, signifying homes and hearths and peace. They did not allow women to see the interior of men’s temples; but I had bought my way in– with a gift of bread and butter!–and the ceremony that was afterward stages outside the men’s sacred house was meant to be interpreted as follows: “You have deserved death for entering the sacred house. But you have been forgiven. You may enter our homes, and it is peace between us.”

I was friends with the old Queen of the Cook Islands, the late Makea Takau, a real monarch, six feet three in height, who ruled her islands with an iron scepter. He Prince Consort, Ngamaru, was less civilized than she; it was his way to threaten people who offended him, by making the “cannibal sign” at them–rapidly drawing his clenched fist across his teeth; the significance being: “I will tear you with my teeth!” As for Makea Takau, she used most courteously to tell an enemy, “I do not expect to see you after Wednesday;” and she enemy walked away, and obediently died on Wednesday, of nothing at all.

The beautiful Princess Tuera (of whom I afterward wrote many stories entitled “Queen Vaiti”) was a friend of mine in the old days. She was Raratongan, extremely lovely, and fiery as a female dragon. She had captained her father’s recruiting schooner, often, and ran it like a bucko mate of whaling days. I never knew her to be beaten by anything or anybody, male or female, alive or dead. Thirty years later, I found that she had defeated even Time, and was beautiful still. She lives in Raratonga, today. Read more : http://www.grimshaworigin.org/WebPages/BeatGrim1.htm#VaitiOfTheIslands

Lean Startup Machine

I took the LSM weekend to learn lean methodology and how I could better test my ideas and start-up with minimal cost !

Here are my key takeaways and insights:

1. A startup is a temporary organization designed to search for a repeatable and scaleable model

Woah!  I had never heard about a start-up operating or being any different from any other company. But it makes a lot of sense to approach it differently. Just like a person would plant a seed or seedling – these infant plants need extra special care and optimal conditions to grow. Later, when the seedling has matured, the plant doesn’t need as sensitive of care. It can weather climate and condition fluctuation better!

2.  Don’t raise money – raise traction

3. The only way to beat the competition is to stop trying to beat the competition

4. People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.

5. Define the ONE Metric that shows you your company is successful

6. Solve individual problems, not social or general problems (a key one for social entrepreneurs!)

Sometimes

SOMETIMES

Sometimes
if you move carefully
through the forest,

breathing
like the ones
in the old stories,

who could cross
a shimmering bed of leaves
without a sound,

you come
to a place
whose only task

is to trouble you
with tiny
but frightening requests,

conceived out of nowhere
but in this place
beginning to lead everywhere.

Requests to stop what
you are doing right now,
and

to stop what you
are becoming
while you do it,

questions
that can make
or unmake
a life,

questions
that have patiently
waited for you,

questions
that have no right
to go away.

– David Whyte
from “Everything is Waiting for You” & “River Flow: New & Selected Poems”
©2003 Many Rivers Press